Food Facility Inspection Results

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Frequently Asked Questions

What type of health inspections are posted on this site?

The County of San Luis Obispo Environmental Health Services Division conducts many types of health inspections, including but not limited to Food Facilities, Public Pools and/or Spas, and Body Art Facilities, just to name a few. At this time, only Food Facility health inspection results are tracked through the online database and are posted on this website.

What is the purpose of an online database?

The online database containing all Food Facility health inspection results is intended to allow the general public access at all times to health inspection results with the most recent food facility health inspection scores. The database is updated nightly.

Who is inspected?

Environmental Health Services conducts health inspections (commonly known as restaurant inspections, food inspections, or Food Facility inspections) at 2200 retail food service establishments that provide food to the general public throughout San Luis Obispo County. These include restaurants, bars, markets/grocery stores, and school cafeterias.

What is evaluated during an inspection?

A food facility health inspection is an evaluation of food preparation and food employee practices, facility condition, food storage and many other factors that contribute to the overall safety of the food products being sold or dispensed for consumption to the public.

What is the purpose of a health inspection report?

The purpose of a health inspection report is to document the health inspection findings and to provide an overall summary of the health inspection. The report is provided to the Food Facility owner or operator following a health inspection.

Health inspection reports are public record and are required to be maintained onsite by the Food Facility and must be made available upon request at any time. However it is not required that health inspection reports be conspicuously posted.

What is included in a health inspection report?

The County of San Luis Obispo Environmental Health Services food facility health inspection report contains at minimum the following information:

  • The date and time of the health inspection,
  • The name and address of the food facility,
  • The permit holder's name,
  • The health permit expiration date and health permit fee payment status,
  • The type of food facility (restaurant, retail market, etc.),
  • The The type of health inspection (regular inspection (routine) or follow up inspection (reinspection)),
  • The score of the health inspection,
  • The food safety certified manager,
  • A list, if applicable, of all violations observed during the health inspection and an overall summary of the health inspection,
  • The name, title, and signature of the person in charge accepting the report,
  • A summary of corresponding laws and regulations taken from the California Retail Food Code,
  • If applicable, an award of excellence may also be issued with the report. View the Award of Excellence web page for more information.
What types of health inspections are performed?

There are two types of health inspections which result in a score and get posted on this site, a regular, or routine inspection, and a follow up inspection, or reinspection.

Regular health inspections are routine unannounced health inspections.

Follow up inspections, or reinspections, are conducted only when the health inspector has determined during a regular health inspection that a follow up inspection is required to verify compliance with documented California Retail Food Code violations noted during the regular health inspection.

How often is a food facility inspected?

The frequency of regular health inspections is based on a "risk-based" classification system. A food facility's "risk" is determined by the type of operation occurring within a food facility. The classification reflects it's potential for a food item (such as sushi or raw oysters) or food preparation process (such as cooking, cooling, then reheating prior to service) to result in illness if proper food handling, storage, and/or other sanitary requirements are not met. Classifications include Full Preparation, Limited Preparation, and Minimal Preparation.

Food facility regular health inspection frequencies are as follows:

  • Full Preparation - every 6 months
  • Limited Preparation - every 9 months
  • Minimal Preparation - every 12 months

Food facility follow up inspections, or reinspections, are performed as determined by the inspector and typically occur within 2-4 weeks following the initial (regular, or routine) inspection.

How is the health inspection score determined?

It is the policy of the County of San Luis Obispo Environmental Health Services Division to not present a health inspection score as a letter restaurant grade or restaurant rating, but rather as an overall restaurant score which is based on a maximum of 100 points scoring system.

Points are deducted based on observations of violations occurring within, or in conjunction with, the food facility at the time of the health inspection. More points are deducted for violations that may result in a higher food safety risk if they are not corrected. These can include such things as non-compliance with hand washing, food temperatures, surface sanitization, safe food sources, and employee health.

Fewer points are deducted for minor violations that are usually associated with the condition of the facility, the equipment, and less risky food handling violations.

Additional points are deducted if a violation is determined to be a repeat violation which either wasn't corrected following the last inspection, or was corrected but is found to be in violation again. 

What constitutes a "violation" in a food facility?

A violation occurs when a food facility is found to be in noncompliance with any of the requirements set forth in the California Retail Food Code.

Under which conditions would a Food Facility health inspection result in closure?

A Food Facility health inspection may result in closure if any violation is observed which is found to create an imminent health risk which cannot be corrected during the inspection. Common examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Surfacing or inability to properly discharge liquid waste (sewage)
  • Vermin infestation (rodents, cockroaches, etc.)
  • Power or water outages
  • Absence of hand washing supplies
  • Lack of ability to properly clean and sanitize food contact utensils or equipment
  • Operation without a valid health permit to operate
Why can't I see all historical results for a food facility inspection?

Only the most recent health inspection results for food facilities that occurred over the last two (2) years are displayed on this website. If the food facility recently underwent an ownership change, then only the most recent inspection results following the ownership change and which apply to the new owner are displayed.